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Chocolate War

The Chocolate War refers to the dispute between Britain, Ireland and Denmark and other chocolate-producinmg nations in the European Union. France, Belgium, Germany, Spain, Italy and others refused to recognise chocolate produced by these three nations, proposing it should be banned.

The reason for the Chocolate War centred around the ingredients of the chocolate. France and Belgium and their allies argued that the presence of vegetable oil in British chocolate meant that it was not true chocolate. Purists in the complaining nations believed that only cocoa butter oil should be used in chocolate production, and consequently that such products did not have the right to be called chocolate. Britain, Ireland and Denmark argued otherwise.

Despite pressure, Britain and the British public stood hard against this opinion. Suggestions were made prevent the to rename British chocolate as 'Vegalate', but British government and chocolate manufacturers refused to compromise on the matter.

The Chocolate War came to conclusion in 2003. The European Union Commission decided in favour of the British, avoiding any further conflict. The decision was warmly greeted by British popular opinion and chocolate manufacturers such as Cadbury's and Nestle were similarly pleased. To this day much of British chocolate continues to be produced with the same ingredients as in 1973 and considerably more British chocolate is loved and consumed than thirty years ago.


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